8th Asia Pacific Conference on Exercise and Sports Science 2017

Symposium Speaker 

Name: Jason Kai Wei LEE Ph.D, FACSM

Position: Head Human Performance Lab, DSO National Laboratories, Singapore and Associate Professor (Adj.), Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore

Address: 27 Medical Drive, Singapore 117150

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Dr Jason Lee obtained his first degree (Sports and Exercise Science - 1st Class Honours) from Loughborough University, UK. Following the award of G V Sibley Memorial Prize (top student in the undergraduate programme), he stayed on to complete a PhD in Exercise Physiology under sponsorship from the UK Overseas Research Scholarship and Faculty Studentship. Jason is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and member of Professionals in Nutrition for Exercise and Sport. He sits on several Editorial Boards of peer-reviewed journals and reviews for more than 20 international peer-reviewed journals. Capitalising his experience as a Commando Officer in the Singapore Armed Forces, Jason applies his military knowledge to his current work by functioning as the Head of Human Performance Laboratory at the Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories. He serves in various expert panels in the Singapore Armed Forces and other national and international boards pertaining to human performance and safety. Jason’s main research interests are in fluid balance, thermoregulation and mitigation strategies for improving human performance in the heat. He studies the physiological demands associated with extreme exposures and how humans adapt to ensure survival and optimal performance. He provides consultancy to enhance performance of military and elite sports personnel and serves as an Adjunct Associate Professor in Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore.

 

Thermal impact on performance and health

 

Excessive heat stress compromises endurance performance and increases the risk of heat stroke. The rapid rise of body deep temperature when exercising in the heat often results in impairment of exercise capacity and performance. As such, various heat mitigation strategies are employed to counteract the debilitating effects of heat strain on athletes and workers. Current understanding in this field of research is largely based on data collected from non-heat acclimatised cohorts and therefore its validity remains unanswered for tropical natives where the exposure to heat is higher. This symposium will provide thermoregulatory principles and practical recommendations for individuals seeking to optimise their performance and health in the heat.


 

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